Post Operation

The transplant surgery lasts about three hours. The donor kidney will be placed in the lower abdomen. The blood vessels of donor kidney will be connected to arteries and veins in the receiving body. Once done, the blood returns to flow through the kidneys, minimizing the ischemic time. In most cases, the kidney will soon start to produce urine. Since urine is sterile, it has no effect on the operation. The last step is connecting the ureter from the donor kidney to the bladder of the recipient. The new kidney usually begins functioning immediately after surgery, but depending on the quality of the body it can take several days (kidney vague). The usual stay in the hospital receiving between 4 and 7 days. If complications occur, may be given additional medicines to help the kidney to produce urine.Medicines are used to suppress the immune system and prevent rejection of kidney donor. These drugs should be taken for life by the patient. Today, the most common treatment is medications: tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and prednisone. Some patients may take cyclosporine, rapamycin, or azathioprine, rather than the former. Acute rejection can occur in 10 to 25 of people during the first 60 days after transplantation. The rejection does not mean the loss of the organ, but may require additional treatment . Learn more at this site: Dropbox.